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Day Five Meditation

12 Min
Meditation
35 Favorites

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William James Davies, DCMT
Mind Matters
Exploring what it’s like to use sound as an object for our attention: Mindfulness of Sound can teach us a great deal about how our minds work, and it’s something you can learn to practice no matter where you are, and whatever sounds are present. The recording contains plenty of guidance for beginners.  This is the fifth recording in a series intended for anyone who is new to mindfulness meditations, but also useful to people who might have struggled to engage with meditation practices in the past.  Day by day you will become more familiar with different aspects of mindfulness meditations and exercises, and soon you’ll be comfortable to guide yourself in meditation, rather than just listening to recordings. Even though these meditations are presented as a sequence, you may like to repeat or return to some of the recordings, I would simply recommend that you don’t jump ahead, as you may miss some useful content. 
From the community
10 reflections
R
Rick
Embedded Challenge
I really liked the topic and how WJD presented it. Do me a favor - re-record this without the hypno-music in the background. I would like to have WJD’s commentary set in the sounds of my natural environment. This was a good challenge to be non-judgmental with sounds, as I caught myself being irritated by the background.
L
Linda
Observe sounds
Observe whatever is there with interest, curiosity and nonjudgmental attitude. It seems to be the key to a vital and peaceful life.
K
Kimette
I learned that
Sound meditation was very difficult for me. Just accepting sounds without labeling them is sooo hard!
K
Keith
Sounds -Day 5
Like any excellent presenter, Davies appreciates the sound of his own voice. The ideas presented were outstanding and the suggestion on how to focus were well delivered. Sadly, the desire to explain and express overrode the time needed to go to the tasks at hand. Figuratively, if you set the table - you should allow people time to serve themselves while taking in the aromas and sounds of the gathering rather than controlling the amount of food put on the plate while forcing snippets of dialog or action.
K
Keith
Sounds -Day 5
Like any excellent presenter, Davies appreciates the sound of his own voice. The ideas presented were outstanding and the suggestion on how to focus were well delivered. Sadly, the desire to explain and express overrode the time needed to go to the tasks at hand. Figuratively, if you set the table - you should allow people time to serve themselves while taking in the aromas and sounds of the gathering rather than controlling the amount of food put on the plate while forcing snippets of dialog or action.
T
Tania
Learning
Through meditation, I am learning to observe and understand how, when and why my mind wanders. Hopefully, allowing me, in the future, greater focus. I repeated day 5 more than once: a focus on sound, without judgement, labeling, or distraction, is harder than on the breath!
C
Cherish
Observing Sounds
In this day five meditation of the 10 day series, William guides us to become aware of sounds in our surroundings. Sound can really anchor ourselves to the present moment because as with thoughts, they can change moment to moment. If we really observe, no two thoughts are exactly the same as no two sounds are exactly the same. Instead of labeling the sounds as pleasant or not pleasant, this meditation is to just observe the sounds, without any judgement whatsoever. Because our minds are programmed in such a way that we immediately judge and label every sound we hear, this can be challenging. Sitting in a chair, I began to observe sounds in my surroundings. At first, my mind was quick to label and judge the sounds I was hearing, but then I went deeper within. I began to observe the sounds within the sounds with an open and curious mind, as if I had never heard them before nor knew the origin of the sounds. Doing this, I found that I can meditate anywhere! Namaste...❤️☮️🙏🏻😊
K
Kat
Soundscapes
With William teaching to meditate focused on the sounds you hear, it naturally includes his voice and thoughts. :) I brought my thoughts back to the matter at hand fairly quickly which is one of the best things to gain from meditation. A small thing to learn, but an important one.
WJ
Walter J
Hearing...
This meditation lead me to understand the importance of non-focusing on sounds. Meaning to ‘hear’ all the sounds going on around me, but not really ‘listen’ to them. Example, I can ‘hear’ all kinds of music on a radio station, but when I hear a song I really like, I pay more attention, focus on it and really ‘listen’ to it, for my enjoyment. While I cannot always control what I hear, I can choose what I want to ‘listen’ to. Then he led me to understand it is very similar to how we can ‘observe’ our thoughts without ‘staring’ at them. Observing them with interest, curiosity @ non-judgement is the goal. ‘Staring’ only at the ones I want to be more fully expressed. This was a profound learn for me! I no longer need to get angry at all the negative news being spewed forth constantly, just not ‘listen’ to it. I do feel empathy for those people who just constantly bombard themselves with it. Awareness is essential to a safe, secure and sane existence... especially in the exciting times we are in right now. While we should train ourselves to ‘see’ everything (good & bad, positive & negative, Beneficial & Detrimental) ... we also need to learn to take care to only ‘focus’ on what we want to have more of! Because ... Where Focus Goes, Energy Flows!! I personally choose to focus on more Beneficial thoughts than Detrimental ones. We can & will have many good things come out of this pandemic, as long as we have enough people to look for it and not focus on just the negative news! Hope you will join me in staying Focused on the positive my friends! ❤️🙏🏼🍀
D
Dan
Equanimity
Observing life’s inputs can be done in a mindful way - that is to practise equanimity by doing so - meaning that when mindfully observing an input (sound, sensation, what we see) is by observing the experience as it occurs in a way where I don’t need to label or attach any thoughts, feelings or judgements to it. This can help in life - especially during times where a strong sensation occurs - if you practise enough you can apply that here. I guess this could help me to (a) learn your recognise emotions and feelings (b) react in a value-driven way.